David Greenberg

Using Social Media to Grow Your Brand

If there is one thing that social media is helpful with it is entrepreneurship and building your own business. Apps like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram allow you to build your own brand and reach multiple different amounts of people.

One person that made an entire fortune out of building his brand on social media sites, Gary Vaynerchuk. He took his family’s wine company of $3 million and turned it into $60 million. After his meteoric rise as one of the biggest up-and-coming entrepreneurs, he talked about his new book, “Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook.”

In an interview, he talked about his philosophy when it came to his persona on social media. He talked about his mindset of caring so much about what people think, however, at the same time he could care less about what people think.

This was so interesting to me because I feel like as a successful entrepreneur you have to not care what people think of you, to a certain extent. You have to be able to take criticism and not take it personally when someone or something attacks your brand.

The other thing that I learned from all this was different apps are better for different types of branding. For example, Instagram uses their ability to build a community through visual arts. Facebook is the most common and popular app to use for promoting businesses because it has the most wide range of age users.

This was all interesting to learn about because it really helped me understand what are the best sites to help build my business and the most effective course action.

5 thoughts on “Using Social Media to Grow Your Brand

  1. I really liked when you said, “You have to be able to take criticism and not take it personally when someone or something attacks your brand”. We talk a lot about how social media is about more than just selling a product, it’s also about making connections and receiving feedback from your audience. It’s important to not take things personally and actually allow criticism to create discussion and feedback towards your product and business. I’ve seen in my own personal experiences that criticism has allowed people to redesign or innovate products to adhere to more people, so I really liked that you pointed that out!

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  2. I agree that to be a successful entrepreneur, like Gary said, you have to give a shit – but at the same time, you have to give zero shits. You have to care enough to provide customers and the public with what they need, but not care to the point that their backlash effects you. It’s a give and take, and Gary struck that balance.

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  3. You are right. When we make money with a product. I think an important means of propaganda is necessary. Hot topics on the Internet always attract people’s attention. When we choose the right social media, we can turn our products into popular products, even if our products have no advantages among our peers.

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  4. Great points you make here, David. When you wrote “You have to be able to take criticism and not take it personally when someone or something attacks your brand,” I think not only is that an important entrepreneurial skill, but also for an affluent professional life in general. For someone not to take constructive criticism, well, constructively, it tells me they can’t separate different aspects of life, which is very important when making a startup.

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  5. I like your opinion that “I feel like as a successful entrepreneur you have to not care what people think of you, to a certain extent. You have to be able to take criticism and not take it personally when someone or something attacks your brand.” I think an entrepreneur has to have a big heart and a critical mind to view different comments from different people with different backgrounds. If we care too much, then we are easy to be influenced, which hurt our credibility. But if we don’t care at all, we might miss positive advice, which would also hurt our credibility. I think the most difficult part as an entrepreneur is that “extent” that you mentioned.

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