Xin Wen

The Brilliant Inheritance

inheritence-knowledge

Last Wednesday, it was horned to have Donna Ladd, the editor of the Jackson Free Press, as a guest speaker to share her story with us.

Ladd is an editor, journalist, and columnist originally from Philadelphia, Mississippi. She mostly focuses on focused on justice, crime, race, kids, policing and politics in Mississippi, New York City and nationwide. She co-founded the Jackson Free Press as her start-up in 2002. She is currently a freelance writer for The Guardian and a W.K. Kellogg Foundation fellow.

She was not born to be a great journalist. Donna Ladd is the daughter of illiterate parents, and her mother pushed her to succeed in school. She was one of the first members of her family to attend college and the first to earn a master’s degree, in 2001, from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Besides her regular career life, she is also a teacher and speaker, offering talks to journalism and writing students, from Columbia and Medill/Northwestern universities, to nearly every college in Mississippi. She teaches Writing to Change Your World narrative non-fiction workshops and seminars.

I really appreciate Donna’s work because she not only devoted to journalism but also bring her productive and valued experience and knowledge to more people. She is a real fighter and innovator for the hope and future of journalism.

She is one of the few female political voices in Mississippi.

“My goal is to uncover and write about the smartest policing practices and reforms in a balanced, solutions-oriented fashion by telling rich and honest stories about the people on the front lines of this difficult, but predictable, rift between communities of colors and the men and women who police them,” she said on her blog.

It is difficult for women to have a politics-related job in men’s world. But she made it and made is very successful. I have to ask myself: do I have the courage to stand for voiceless people? Do I have the courage to bear the enormous pressure from people who oppose me? Do I have the courage to uncover the serious society problem?

She is not popular with everyone. Her work on racial reconciliation has raised criticism from some local white conservatives, prompting disparaging nicknames and satirical Web sites about her. Critics include “white nationalist” Richard Barrett, who called her the “hip-hop editor” and an “integrationist” on his Web site. (Wikipedia)

When Amy talked about what Donna has experienced, she cried. It was so quiet at that time. But Donna’s face in the screen was so brilliant and beautiful. Thanks for her effort and thanks for every knowledge Donna and Amy gave us. It’s the Brilliant Inheritance.

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2 thoughts on “The Brilliant Inheritance

  1. “When Amy talked about what Donna has experienced, she cried. It was so quiet at that time. But Donna’s face in the screen was so brilliant and beautiful. Thanks for her effort and thanks for every knowledge Donna and Amy gave us. It’s the Brilliant Inheritance.”

    OK, this made my cry a little. THANK YOU. Sniff.

    Like

  2. P.S. I’m super proud of Amy. As a 19-year-old intern I was working with, she listened, soaked up everything, worked extremely hard to do real journalism and has helped me throughout my career. That is the kind of loyalty, learning mindset, positive attitude and focus that it takes to make a difference in the world and lift others up while they lift you up. Selfishness doesn’t belong in journalism or anywhere else.

    Liked by 1 person

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